When the rain falls in the UK, who gets to get the best gear?

AUSTRALIA is not alone when it comes to the cost of using heavy rain gear.

In fact, Australia is the only developed country to not have a minimum price on gear for heavy rainfall, despite a heavy rainfall event costing around $300 billion, according to a report from the Australian Government’s Bureau of Meteorology.

Australia is also the only country where there is a maximum price for heavy rain, according the report.

“Australia has not had a price on heavy rain equipment since the early 1970s and we have a strong preference for the Australian market,” Dr Mark Evans, a research fellow at the University of New South Wales, told ABC News.

Mr Evans said the lack of a price for equipment was a major barrier to the use of the equipment.

“[We] have had a number of heavy rain events and they have not been met with an affordable price,” he said.

The report said the costs of using equipment such as floodlights and water cannons to protect property were prohibitive.

A number of major Australian companies have been hit with heavy rain costs and fines in recent years.

In 2013, for example, the Australian Taxation Office fined two Australian-based companies $50 million for using flood lights to block the view of motorists.

Other major Australian firms, such as Gonski, have also been hit by heavy rain fines and fines, with Gonskei, for instance, being fined $5 million for an “unsafe” construction site in Adelaide, according a statement from the company.

Dr Evans said Australia was not the only place to have a maximum pricing system.

He said that the Australian government’s recent policy change on a maximum $2.5 million fine for not having a minimum pricing system, was a positive step in improving the state of Australia’s infrastructure.

However, he said Australia needed to ensure that it kept an eye on its rainy weather policies and make sure they worked as a deterrent to people from using heavy rainfall gear.

Topics:environment,weather,government-and-politics,environmental-policy,government,australia